Sophie de Stempel (Ian Holm’s Wife) Bio, Age, Husband, Children and Family

Sophie de Stempel (Ian Holm's Wife)
Sophie de Stempel (Ian Holm’s Wife)

Sophie de Stempel Bio-Wiki

This is what you need to know about Sophie de Stempel, a Hythe, United Kingdom native well known for being the fourth wife of the late Ian Holm. Stempel is also an artist and life model of Lucian Freud.

Her husband Ian Holm, was a well known English actor on stage and in film. He passed away on 19 June 2020 at the age of 88. He had been battling Parkinson’s disease for a couple of years and was in hospital before his death.

Ian Holm Death (Sophie de Stempel Dead)

Ian Holm was an acclaimed British actor whose long career included roles in “Chariots of Fire” and “The Lord of the Rings”. He passed away on June 19, 2020, at the age of 88.

Holm died peacefully Friday morning in a hospital, surrounded by his family and carer, his agent, Alex Irwin, said in a statement. His illness was Parkinson’s related.

A star of stage and screen, Holm won a Tony Award for the best-featured actor as Lenny in Harold Pinter’s play “The Homecoming” in 1967.

Sophie de Stempel Age

Sophie de Stempel was born in 1960 in Hythe, United Kingdom. She is about 60 years old as of 2020.

Sophie de Stempel Husband

Sophie de Stempel was married to Ian Holm from 2003 until his death on June 19, 2020. Previous, Ian was first married to Lynn Mary Shaw
from 1955 but div. in 1965. His second wife Sophie Baker married from 1982 until 1986. His third wife was Penelope Wilton married from 1991 but div. in 2001.

Sophie de Stempel Net Worth

Stempel’s net worth is still under review however her late husband Ian Holm had a net worth of £8million.

Sophie de Stempel Career

De Stempel is an artist by profession and has worked for 8 years, for Lucian Freud and has exhibited at the Albemarle Gallery with Pippa Houldsworth as well as Rebecca Hossack.

She describes drawing as her passion. “I believe many things, ideas, films start by putting pencil to paper. I have always collected drawings and prints; really it is the beginning of understanding how something could be made, the first steps to painting.

“A bit like the need to see trees in winter, their structure before full bloom, or understanding the inside of a clock.”

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